ChatOps | Alerting to Slack

groovy-logo-mediumOne of the less used features of Logscape, is the groovy script action when alerting. Despite how powerful this feature is, it’s often left by the wayside. Today we’re going to walk through using the groovy event to log the alerts to a channel on your slack server. Continue reading

Analysing and Visualising NYC 311 complaints

In this blog post we’re going to be looking at what some people might call “big” data. No that doesn’t mean big in the conventional sense, it means big in the sense that the single file dataset is 10 Gb in size, and I wanted to make a “big data” pun.

The data in question is a record of NYC’s 311 complaints since 2010, the 6th most popular dataset on the opendata website. “311” is a complaints hotline in NYC, for those interested in following along or investigating the data themselves, it is freely available from the open data website.

Today we’re going to cover

  • Creating a data source and importing the data
  • First look at the data to determine interesting fields
  • Some basic visualisations of the data.

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Visualizing UK accident data with Logscape

In my ever onward quest to show to the world how easy it is to get up and started with Logscape, today I’m going to use a Logscape docker container in order to build visualisations based off some publicly available CSV files in no time at all. If you’ve never used the Logscape docker image, then check out my previous blog.

Today we’re going to be analysing data made available via the gov.uk website, which offers statistics for crashes in the UK for the year of 2015. The specific dataset is available for download here.

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Concatenation or Parameters? Both? What’s the top method of Java logging.

Concatenation or Parameters? Which should we use.

Now it’s undeniable, we techies love to argue about anything we can. Emacs or Vi? Tabs or spaces? Dark theme or Light theme? Brackets on the method line, or the next? to name but a few. We can even see examples of these arguments if you follow discussions on Twitter.

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