Migrate Logscape to a new Manager

Congratulations! You finally have the go ahead from Management to expand your Logscape environment. You need to scale up from a few test machines to a larger environment. Unfortunately, you ran your proof of concept from Steve’s Dev machine. Or perhaps you underestimated the volume of data and urgently need faster disks to improve performance. You’re going to need to migrate your Logscape Manager to a new server, which is precisely why you’re reading this guide…

Migrations are hard

Preparation – What you will need:

Source Manager: The manager you are migrating from.

Target Manager: The manager you are migrating to.

LDAP Credentials (Optional but recommended)

SSL Certificates and Credentials (Optional but recommended)

Make sure that you are running the same version of Logscape on the Source and Target – as always we recommend using the latest version.

The following guide assumes you are using 3.1 or greater – if not, upgrade to 3.1 before you start.

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Failover: Keeping your Environment alive!

Why Everything I Have Is Broken

Computers break… it’s a fact of life! Sometimes it’s a nice quick fix, such as the one cunningly suggested by Randall Munroe. Sometimes it can take hours of trawling through logs. Regardless of the reason, in an ideal world,you want to fix the problem as soon as possible; but the next best thing is to have a Failover – another server that works just as well!

In a Logscape environment, your Management agent is the central point of your environment. It controls alerts, provides users access and runs the entire system: without it, you have nothing. So how do you make sure that your environment is resilient against a Management Agent failure? Simple… you add another one!

The recent 3.2 Logscape release has added new and improved Failover capabilities, making it easier to provide a seamless environment for your users. Having recently implemented this feature in my environment, I thought I’d share with you both the benefits – and the possible pitfalls – of installing this useful bit of kit.

You will need:

  • An existing Logscape Environment with a subscription (Failover is not supported without a license) running at least version 3.2.
  • A server you wish to make your new Failover Agent.
  • A little bit of understanding about ports
  • A pinch of bravery.

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boot.properties – 5 hints for Logscape Environments

A Logscape Agents is incredibly powerful: it might be a Forwarder shipping data or an IndexStore receiving it. It might even be a Management Agent providing the web front end. Regardless of what it may become, they all start from the boot.properties file. This small, innocuous looking file sitting in the Logscape folder is what makes the difference between a powerful, resource consuming Manager and a small, lightweight forwarder. Here are 5 useful tips for dealing with this file. Continue reading

Lifecycle tracking with TXN in Logscape!

The Problem of Ticket Tracking

online_package_trackingSystems tend to have workflows – where an object or ticket are passed around different systems. As someone responsible for monitoring such a system, I need to be able to keep track of the events to ensure that customers get served and orders processed. My main aim in this example is to track how long it takes to process tickets.

This kind of assumes you already have a Logscape environment running. If you don’t, download it now and get started!

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10 Ways to Improve Your Output File

cloudcomputingjoke-300x259So you have written an app or log – it’s brilliant, it grabs all the data you need and runs like greased lightning. All you need to do now is ensure your output file has a nice clean format – preferably one that means Logscape does all the work for you! So here are some of my top tips.

1) Add a full time stamp to every line. You wouldn’t believe how much trouble can be caused by people using just times or dates. At the best, you have to struggle to get your data properly organised. At worst, you end up with a mess and data appears in the wrong place on the graph. Do it right, set the date and time!

2) Add a time zone to that stamp. My computer will never move time-zone, surely it’ll be fine? Don’t count on it. British Summer Time changing the system time on half your servers, servers being reset to US time, data centres moving locations… All these things can and will happen. Adding the time zone to the stamp gives you a cast iron assurance that the data will always be correct. That peace of mind is worth a few bytes.

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