30 Seconds of reading, hours of watching – 10 monitoring talks everyone should see

Here at Logscape it should go without saying that monitoring is sort of a big deal. Some would even go as far as to say it’s even our “thing”. To go with that we’ve collated a collection, of what we think might be the best 10 monitoring talks people should watch. Regardless of whether you’re looking to implement a logging tool, build your own or are just a developer, these talks are worth the time.

Monitoring at Spotify – When things go ping in the night. – by Martin Parm

This non-tech talk covers how logging at Spotify has adapted over the years. From the days where monitoring what just a gleam in the developer’s eyes, to the months where operations slept restlessly fearing the inevitable phone call, to the current day monitoring system which act as caretakers to the infrastructure responsible for streaming hundreds of thousands of tracks a day.

Metrics, Metrics everywhere – by Coda Hale

Digging back into the archives, we have Coda Hale’s talk from 2011. While you may think it’s dated, and irrelevant by todays standards. Coda covers some topics which will simply never get old.

Monitoring is Dead. Long Live Monitoring. – by Greg Poirier

Greg Poirer thinks it’s time we stop viewing its metrics in isolation¬†and declare things alive or dead. In this laid back high-energy talk, he covers his opinion on the definition of monitoring, with only a few jabs at DevOps. A must watch.

Better living through statistics. Monitoring doesn’t have to suck. – by Jamie Wilkinson

Jamie Wilkinson goes over what he believes to be the problems in how we currently monitor, and how we can get rid of these problems so that everyone can benefit from logging. A great talk that discusses why our current logs simply aren’t precise enough.

 

The art of performance monitoring. – by Brian Smith

Brian Smith covers the mistakes that he’s made, and the mistakes he keeps seeing developers making. For a 25 minute talk the sheer quantity of technical ideas conveyed in this talk is impressive, but not for the faint of heart.

What should I monitor, and how should I do it? – by Baron Schwartz

In this talk, Baron criticises our approach to monitoring, which is to just stare at a graph and attempt to determine what’s gone wrong. Baron highlights the importance of not just collecting data, but collecting actional data.

Creating a Culture of Observability. – by Cory Watson

Taking a leaf out of the Spotify playbook, this talk covers the culture around logging, rather than logging itself. It’s Cory’s own story of how after joining Strike he managed to instil a culture of observability and monitoring. You’ll hear about his journey towards that goal, with the good, the bad and the downright sneaky.

How monitoring works at scale. – by Ran Leibman

Facebook manage to claim another spot on this top list, this time discussing the challenge which is monitoring the huge amount of infrastructure that make up Facebook around the world. Most companies dont have to monitor on this scale, which leaves an obvious questions, “How exactly do you?”.

The evolution of monitoring systems at google. – by Tom Rippy

Following in the steps of Facebook, Google returns for its second spot in the list. Much like the Spotify talk above, Tony Rippy aims to walk us through the progression of monitoring at Google, and includes some facts that you just wouldn’t believe about the now Tech-Giant.Tony wasn’t present for the whole of this history, but it’s portrayed in a fun and interesting way, which demonstrate whilst your current monitoring solution may not be the best, it doesn’t mean you can’t progress.

Allison McKnights talk demonstrates how monitoring doesn’t have to be expensive. Hailing from Etsy which is known for doing a lot with not a lot. Allison walks us through her experiences of using open source projects to build a monitoring system capable of monitoring the entirety of Etsy’s back end.

 

Hopefully you’ve enjoyed the videos, if you have any that you feel should be added to the list, feel free to drop them below, or tweet @logscape with why.